The Game – Guest Post by D.L. Strand

Every once in a while you come across a piece of writing that strikes a chord within you. When I read this short story, I immediately loved it. It touched, what I believe, every writer who has been at this craft for any length of time feels. I asked if I could share this story. You can find other writing from D.L. Strand here.

The Game

The old man sat at his desk, scanning the fresh-typed words. His Olympia Manual waited patiently. Silently. Eager to record any thoughts he felt like sharing.

The words wouldn’t flow as they once did. There was a time when the hammers struck sparks and the words exploded off the page for those who read them.

He pursued the revelation. The constant eureka. He didn’t know how the process worked. It just worked. Of course, some days were better than others.

Especially now.

This was the tragedy of age. He knew he wasn’t as fast as he once was. Not as sharp. The audience was smaller, many of them moved on, one way or another.

His fingers, like his back, grown bent and stiff with age, moved slow and ponderous on the keyboard. Still, like a well-worn hammer, they pounded out the words as they came.

Still, every morning he sat down at his well-worn chair – the one that leaned slightly to the right – and hunted.

There are those who think inspiration a gift. He knew better. He knew Inspiration as a fickle mistress, to be wooed, seduced, pampered. The more you romanced her, the more she’d flirt with you.

She never came on strong. Not at first. She’d lightly tease the fuzzy edges of his dreams. Stroke the embers of his imagination. Eventually, he’d lose himself in the seduction. The fire. Unaware of the world around him. Typing furiously. Images scorching the page. Fingers struggling to keep up with the drama playing out in his head.

Sometimes he chased her all day, it was true. Never catching a glimpse. But later, after he’d left his desk and put his labors behind him, she would tempt some half-formed dream out of his thoughts. It could be during the news, a movie, while drifting off to sleep, or in the shower.

It seemed, that sometimes, running water drew her to him. Obviously, it wasn’t his body. Not anymore. Not ever. He had after all, the frame of a writer, built through years of sitting – stooped over his typewriter – drinking black coffee, eating donuts or whatever his wife put in front of him. Some days, he was unaware that he had eaten at all. But the evidence was there. The empty cup, the smeared plate.

It wasn’t that life didn’t attract him. He loved his wife. He loved the mornings spent together over eggs and coffee. And he loved the children they’d raised together.

He knew that it hadn’t been easy. Artists are a selfish lot, after all. Everything takes a backseat to the muse.

He was committed to his muse. And why not? Had they not shared 1000 stories? Created people? Worlds? Gods? Had she not given him a life richer than any he’d hoped for, had he worked for a company or gotten a job?

Job! It should be a four letter word. Who cared if he ate. Art drove him. He could go days without eating, but never a day without his art. No, never that.

So he sat in the place where he knew, one day he would die, surrounded by his volumes of his work, and those his peers. His awards. A fan’s standout letter claiming his words changed her life. A  framed note from an old teacher insisting he had no talent. In many ways, that letter gave him more pleasure than any of the awards or acclamations.

Today, he sensed a slight difference in the air. In the pressure on his face. In his lungs. Was it the weather? The season? No, he thought to himself. Nothing so mundane as that.

He searched for the cause. Not with his eyes or nose, but with his fingers. His mind. He knew that the change was not external. And yet…

He asked his muse, what was the change? If he could gain the truth of it, he could express it.

He sensed a stirring at his back. A bony hand on his shoulder. It was The Call. The one he’d dreaded. No Muse reached out for him today. No, it was her cousin, come to steal his breath.

He felt the icy breath on his ear. “Your efforts are done. Cease your toils.”

He typed on as if his fingers could flee for him.

‘I won’t leave with another story in me.’ He pressed on, struggling to remain, to complete just one more tale. To share another small slice of his soul with a hungry world.

“Come. She’s no longer yours. Moved on to younger fingers – agile minds. Her faithless eyes gaze elsewhere.”

Bitter sweat racing down his neck, he hunkered down, and continued his pursuit. His fingers floundered here and there.

“Stop this folly. Let someone else have their turn. Step back. Stand up. Release your pain and be free.”

He leaned in all the harder. His brow furrowed – squeezing words out of his mind. It dripped slowly, like juice from a spent orange.

“Come.” Another bony hand grasped his shoulder. An ache clutched his chest.

“NO!” He shrugged off the clasping hands. Not while I have breath in my lungs. Life in my fingers. They flailed for the formless. The story. The song. Just one touch to scratch another tale out of the scaly mind that once gushed forth prose and song like a fountain of shimmering water.

The Presence leaned in. Weight bore down on his shoulders. The final kiss to end his tale.

His fingers began to falter, to stumble, to slow.

‘Wait!’ He thought. “What was death, but the ultimate inspiration?”

He inhaled deep and righted himself. Ripped out the spent page, replaced it, and began the race anew.

He recognized The Shade for what it was. Just an outfit. A costume.

His Muse loved him. Loved the chase. She tried one final time. “Have an end.” She whispered.

He smiled. “No.” He whispered back “Let’s dance.”

She smiled and kissed his head. Her man. Her writer. He’d just needed a little push after all.

The shot fired. The game was on.

D.L. Strands Websites:

http://dlstrand.com/

The Storyteller’s Pub

 

Remember

On water, land, and in flight, they answered the call,

Protectors of liberty and right, against evil and the wrong.

Marching to a different drum, they sang a different song.

Misunderstood by many, as to why they gave their all,

 

America, these are your daughters, these are your sons,

These are your warriors, who gave all when they gave.

We recount to the generations, the valor of the brave.

Now we are the watchers, we volunteer to be the ones.

 

Listen now, dear children, of our country’s warrior band,

Hear their stories, honor them, be proud of their fight.

How one could give their life in pursuit of the right.

Grasp what was given since the beginning of our land.

 

As the flags are lowered, and the lone bugle plays.

Turn your thoughts to heroes, and the sacrifices made.

To the guardians of freedom, and the high cost they paid.

To those with warrior hearts, who stepped into harm’s ways.

 

You are their legacy, the torch is passed down to you,

Hold high your heads, as Tap’s last note is played.

Hold tight to their memory, and never let it fade.

Salute, remember and give these heroes their due.

Meet Linda Tillis; Crime Scene Investigator (Ret.), Photographer, and Author.

Linda Tillis

One of the best things I have gained from blogging, writing, podcasting, and audiobook narrating over these past several years is the people that I engage with. One of those people that I have had the honor of developing a friendship and partnership with is Linda Tillis. She has written three books, and I have had the pleasure of narrating two. I believe you will find her as interesting as I do. Recently, she agreed to let me interview her.

 

Q: Your third book (A Heart for All Time) has just released on Amazon for pre-sale on Kindle. Congratulations!   Have you always wanted to be an author?

A:  As much as I loved to read in my younger years, I never once gave thought to becoming an author.  And I did love to read!  In my senior year of high school, I would sell book reports to friends during Thursday’s lunch hour.

 

Q: Tell us about your early career that led up to your writing.

A:  Immediately after graduation, I went to work at a sewing factory. (Thank goodness for four years of Home Economics). I spent eighteen years there, nine years on the sewing floor, then nine years as the assistant to the production manager. When garment manufacturing started to die here in the United States, I saw the handwriting on the wall and started looking for another job.

I went to work for the local police department. I spent a few months as a dispatcher, then applied for an opening as a non-sworn Crime Scene Investigator.  The Corporal who trained me had been a medic in Vietnam. He had been doing CSI work for ten years and believed that no one should do it for longer than that.  I replaced him and went on to do the work for twenty years.

During those years I saw a side of life that most folks never see, and that’s a good thing. The constant exposure to death, brutality, and total lack of morality can either harden a person or push a person to the edge of their personal tolerance.  My husband realized I had reached my limit and suggested that I retire.  I realized he was correct, and when I reached the twenty-year mark, I left police work.

 

Q: It’s interesting that you have broken down your career into segments. So, what was the next chapter in your life? Pun intended.

A: My husband bought me a good camera and said,” Now go out and take pictures of living things.” And so, I did.

Once I had a nice portfolio of nature photography, he insisted I should write articles and sell them.  I sold two separate articles, with photos, to the Florida Wildlife Magazine. During this time, I had gone back to work for the local sheriff office as a 911 dispatcher. At the end of seven years, I retired permanently. Then my husband said, “You should write a book about the things you’ve seen.”

I jokingly said, okay. But once I had started, the first book just poured out. I found it was less painful to address the awful memories if I put them in a historical context, so I became a historical romance/inspirational writer. Telling stories of strong women who overcome adversity to find the love they deserve.

 

Q: Looking back, what would you say that you would have done differently?

A:  The only thing I might have done differently, is to start writing earlier, however, I am a firm believer that everything happens in the Lord’s time. I believe He knew I would need this career at this point in life, and I attribute my small success to Him.

 

A Heart for All TimeQ: So, now you have three books out. The most recent, A Heart for All Time, has just been released. Would you tell us a little about it?

A: It is a time travel set in Greeneville, Tennessee, where my sister has lived for several years. Just like the first two, there is a thread of law enforcement. The heroine, Sarah Haskins, is a 911 operator. She buys a piece of Cherokee Indian jewelry that transports her back to 1890 just in time to save a man from hanging.

 

Q: I would like to post links to your books and your author page. Which ones would you like for me to use?

A: I am in the process of building a new website, but, anyone interested can follow me at

https://www.facebook.com/LindaTillisAuthor/

The books can be found on Amazon at   https://amzn.to/2uL3TBJ

Or The Wild Rose Press at   https://bit.ly/2IuRrYT

 

You Are Called

This last week a young man came to me at our church to ask what it would take for him to become a deacon. I smiled and asked why he would want to be a deacon. He said he wanted to be more committed to God and the church. I remembered when I felt called to go deeper in my commitment to Christ. I went to our pastor and asked. I remember our pastor loved me enough to tell me that I was not ready to be in the ministry or even licensed to preach. I was hurt. I thought this was the next steps when God calls you.

Back to the young man. As I was trying to figure out how to answer him without crushing his spirit, I told him he had to be married. I was stalling. “You’re making that up,” he said. I took out my bible and turned to I Timothy 3 and showed him the qualifications of a deacon. “Look, you’re supposed to have children too,” I pointed out. He said, “Well, what does it take to be an usher?” I began to laugh. I told him that I admired his desire and for him to study the passage in the bible and we would talk again.

The Main Question

The main question here would be: is everyone called? I think the answer is yes. Too often we associate our call with some kind of church work or missionary endeavor. I don’t believe the bible shares this point of view. Here’s why. If God only called people to church vocations then who would farm? Who would teach? Who would enforce the law? Who would do any vocation? God is sovereign. The world, though now fallen was created perfectly by Him and He didn’t just walk away afterward.  What did he call the first man and woman to do? To tend the garden. The bible further shows how God called kings as well as prophets. It tells how He set times, peoples, and nations. He is a God of order.

Our Race

pexels-photo-618612.jpeg    In the bible in the book of Hebrews, chapter 12, we are instructed to run our race. That race is different for all of us. The main problem with the world is that mankind thinks they know better than God. Again, look at the Garden of Eden. If we all did what God called us to do then the world would function perfectly. We, mankind, are flawed and subsequently, our ways are also flawed. Still, there is within all of us a calling. Some call it a passion. Either way, it is there.

pexels-photo-696573.jpeg    I had a chance to talk with this young man again on another day. I explained to him that he indeed had a calling. God did not create us first and then think, “Hmm, what could I have him do?” No, God had a purpose in mind when He created each of us. That is our race. God had the race first and then He created someone to run that race. The young man asked me how to find his calling. I asked him what he was passionate about. He told me his dreams. I told him to start there. I also told him that he could do a process of elimination. I.e. did he feel led to farm, police work, or teaching. He said, “No.” Then I said he could rule these out. I told him to try different things and if he failed not to see these are failures, but as learning opportunities to find his purpose.

Are you looking for your purpose? Here are five things you could do, just like I told the young man and others to get going in the right direction:

  1. Know that without a doubt you were created for a purpose and that God wants you to know it. Hebrews 12:1 and following.
  2. Read the bible for examples where God called men and women from all walks of life.
  3. Read The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren and start with the five things that God has called us all to do.
  4. Eliminate what you know for sure you don’t have any interest in doing. I would suggest, if possible by trying it first.
  5. Seek out the things that do interest you and try them. Once you try them, you might find out you really weren’t as interested as you first thought.

 

 

Meet Peter Younghusband: Nurse and Book Review Guru

PETERWhen I was working on publishing my first book in 2015, someone told me to join some writing groups. I did some searching around on Facebook and saw one I found interesting. It is one of those groups you have to be accepted in to be a part of it. I read some of the feed and thought this one was pretty interesting. So, I asked to join. Just like that, I was introduced to the group. I was welcomed by the group instantly. I noticed there was a gentleman who consistently posted reviews of books like the one I was working on. It was Peter. After getting to know Peter better through his posts and his reviews of books (blog: Reviews by Peter), and email correspondence, I asked if he would take a look at my book. He did and posted his review. The link is listed here. Over the years he has given me sound advice and has become a good friend. That is why I wanted to share my friend with you.

 

Q: First off, could tell everyone where you live?

Peter: I currently live in Point Cook, a suburb west of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

 

Q: Tell us a little bit about your younger life, family, and how that affected your choice of occupation.

Peter: I am the youngest of three with an older brother and sister. We all just happen to be exactly 16 months apart, pure fluke, not planned! My mother was a Registered Nurse and my father was a clerk with the Australian Post Office.

My parents had us, three children, later in their life. My mother was in her late 30s when my sister was born and I was purely a mistake on their part as my mother had actually started menopause! I grew up with my mother telling me stories about being a Nurse and also listening to her do the same with her Nursing friends. In Year 12, when I realized that Teaching was not what I wanted to do, I decided to give Nursing a try, seeing I grew up familiar with this. So I applied and started the following year. I was 19 years at the time.

 

Q: So, you were off to nursing school, a choice that not only led to your career choice, but to another life-changing event. Tell us about that.

Peter: After graduating 3 years later, I consolidated my nursing career for 2 years in the general wards of the hospital. After this, I branched out into a specialized area of Nursing. This dealt with the diseases of the eye, ear, nose, and throat [(Ophthalmology and ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat)] as I loved these during training. My other passion for Nursing was working in the community, specifically in Occupational Health (Industry). To do this, I needed to have experience in Accident and Emergency. So I took a position in this department and it was here that I met my future wife, Debra. She was an Occupational Health Nurse (Nurses who work in Industry applying Health and safety from a Nursing POV to employees) and sent one of her injured employees to this department where I was working. She had a position available at the abattoir where she worked. I applied and was successful in my application.  Nine months later we married! I continued working at the abattoir for a further nine months. I then moved to another industry (car manufacturing) then a petrochemical company before being retrenched from a downturn in this industry.

At this stage, we were expecting our first child and I needed a job. I was unable to return to Occupational Health Nursing as I did not have formal qualifications in this field (despite working in it!). I realized I needed a career change in Nursing. I accepted a position at the Australian Red Cross Blood Service. I have been there ever since which adds up to 25 years now.

Peter and coworkers   I am currently working in Medical Services department as a Clinical Nurse Consultant. Here I offer medical advice to blood donors concerning their edibility to donate from a medical perspective. I also offer staff health advice in relation to biological exposures (needle stick injuries, blood and body fluid exposures). My other responsibility is the vaccination against those diseases that staffs are at great risk of being exposed to in dealing with blood donation.

 

Q: You mentioned having a child. How many children do you have now?

Peter: Three years after our first daughter, Laura, was born, we had another daughter, Hannah. Now they are 25 and 22 years respectively. The eldest married in June and has now had her first child.

 

Q: Grandchild? Congratulations. I think we have found another interest and passion for you.Peter and grandbaby

Peter: Now a grandfather!

 

Q: You pointed out your passion for nursing, but this is not your only passion.

Peter: In my childhood and adolescence I loved collecting coins and stamps. I have not continued this since leaving home but still have my collection. My other interest and which I am passionate about is reading. I was not brought up with a love of reading, but it was not discouraged either. How I discovered reading was due to a bullying episode when I was in Grade 3. After their abuse on many levels on that particular school morning, I retreated to the classroom to get away from these bullies. Here I came across a few other students who I knew briefly. They were reading novels when I arrived and we started talking. I asked them about the books they were reading and it was them who introduced me to author Enid Blyton. I was hooked! The Famous Five and The Secret Seven series were my favorites. Then I discovered the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew. From this introduction to reading on that fateful morning, I have always had my head in a book. I even ran the bookstore at Church!

 

Q: I think that is one of the reasons you and I connect, our shared interests. I too collected coins and stamps, but it is our love of reading that caused our paths to cross. I too loved the Hardy Boys, but your love of reading sparked another passion, one for reviewing books on a grander scale. How did that happen?

Peter: I started writing reviews on and off when I discovered Christian fiction when I became a Christian at 19 years of age. My first novel in this genre was Dwellers by Roger Elwood (now out of print). This dealt with the Nephilim whom the Bible mentions in Genesis 6: 4. This was my first introduction to edgy, speculative fiction and I have sought this genre out since. It was this genre that led to my review blog. Steve Goodwin, a Christian author, suggested I start it after I had written a long, but comprehensive, review of his two edgy, speculative fiction novels. He believed that blogs like this would serve well in promoting this genre and in the process, Christian authors. He believed that Christian fiction in all its genres, and especially Christian authors, needed more promotion than secular authors. This has proven to be very true. Reviewers are the best promotion for an author and are their best asset! That is the most motivating reason I keep reviewing.

 

Q: As an avid reader and author, I would have to agree.

Peter:  The other motivating reason is that I feel readers should write a review to show their appreciation of how well the author’s book has affected them. Were they only entertained? Did the author educate them on the subject matter as well? Was God glorified? Was their faith challenged, and relationship with God deepened? If there are any negatives, these can be fed back to the author in a positive manner to encourage the author so they can see what they need to do to improve their writing and novel construction.

 

Q: What other interests’ do you have, my friend?

Peter: My other interests are singing. I used to be the worship leader at church and have been involved in the Music Ministry since becoming a Christian. However, I am not involved anymore. Unfortunately, the side effects of asthma medication have affected my singing voice. I have lost my upper register (high notes) and some of my lower registers as well. I also love modern technology, gizmos, and gadgets.

 

Q: You have been at reviewing for some time now, any advice for would-be authors?

Peter: Be specific in your words, plots, characters, mean what you say and say what you mean. There is nothing worse that ambiguousness or lack of detail or information relating to various parts of the novel. It confuses the reader, detracts from their enjoyment and unfortunately gives the impression the author is not a good an author than the reader thought.

Don’t be afraid to show what you believe as far as Biblical topics or issues are concerned. Be bold in expressing your faith through the characters and plot arcs. You are writing for God so let Him have your creativity and talent to tell the story that He wants to tell. You have no idea how far God can use this to bless, uplift, encourage, challenge or draw the reader whether Christian to Him as part of His plan for their lives.

I have been blessed, uplifted, challenged and even chastised by what a Christian author has written in their novels. Unlike secular authors, your mandate is not only to entertain but to minister to the Christian reader through any biblical principles and expression of your faith in your novel and point the way to God to the reader who does not know God yet or encourage them to consider Him.

Never give up. When discouraged, go to God in prayer, asking for discernment, wisdom. Be Honest with Him and humble.

Seek out the advice and mentoring of other Christian authors. Accept their advice and counsel with a humble heart and a teachable spirit. You will be a better author because of it (and a better version of yourself as well!).

Be the same with the feedback from beta readers, reviewers and do not take it personally. Do not be hard on yourself when you feel that things are going pear-shaped or you feel like giving up. Us readers (and reviewers) do not want you to give up or accept second-rate authorship and novels! We want to sing your praises as an author and being an instrument of God.

Enjoy the story you are creating. It should not be a chore. You are creating a wonderful, unique world in your novel and all for His Glory and purposes. You have quite an honor and privilege to the conduit for God to minister to the reader in the fiction you are creating. Be proud of your work, but remember it is for His Glory and purposes you are writing. His instrument.

 

 Q: Peter thanks for sharing a little bit about you with us. With your permission, I have listed two more interviews on other blogs and your URL link to your site as well.

Peter: My pleasure! That was fun! Thanks for the opportunity!

You learn more about Peter at the two links listed below as well as visit his website to get his take throuigh his reviews on what he calls “edgy” Christian books.

Interview by Christian Author/ Blogger Donovan M. Neal

Interview by Christian Author/ Blogger D.I. Telbat

Reviews by Peter

 

Five Reasons Why You Should Employ the Golden Rule at Work

Golden Ruler  To start, let’s define the Golden Rule, rather than just assuming everyone knows. It was first spoken by Jesus and is a basic principle of life. The premise: treat others as you would have them treat you. If you want respect, give respect. If you want loyalty, give loyalty. If you want courtesy give courtesy. Will you always get what you give? Not always, but here are five reasons why you should still employ and encourage others to employ the Golden Rule in business dealings. They work in tandem with each other.

Better working environment.

If you want others inside and outside of your organization to not only get along but build trust and rapport, then this is foundational. You must build relationships to succeed. It starts with how you treat people. People and relationships flourish in the soil of appreciation, respect, and trust. If you or you allow others, to mistreat those within and without your organization, this equates to abuse. “Even a dog will stop being your friend if you continue to smack him.” Everyone by the very virtue of being a human deserves respect. Insubordination goes only one way – up. Respect and disrespect go two ways. It has been said, “employees don’t quit jobs, they quit bosses.”

Law of Unforeseen Consequences.

A maxim I have used many times is “Be careful of the hell you create today. You will have to live in it tomorrow.” The way you treat people is a decision. A choice. Each choice we make, notice I said, choice not action, has consequences. Non-action is a choice. If we allow or exercise mistreatment, betraying of trust, gossip, or backbiting, then it will come back on your organization. Usually, this is in ways that were unforeseen and to a level, we did not expect. The same is true for treating and encouraging others to treat others well. It’s also the principle of sowing and reaping. You reap what you sow. Sow kindness, get kindness, sow trust, get trust, sow honesty, get honesty.

Structures and relationships will always change.

You do not know today what the structure is going to be like tomorrow. How many times have you seen someone work their way from an entry-level position to one higher than yours or to become your boss? Another saying: “Be careful of who you tick off today, you may need them tomorrow (or they may be your boss tomorrow).” I could probably write pages about this one.   

I once knew a paramedic who was speeding and was stopped by a state trooper. The trooper gave the paramedic a hard time about obeying the law and how he was in the public eye, etc. etc. They got into a heated discussion. The trooper got mad and wrote the paramedic the maximum ticket. Several months later, the trooper flipped his car during a high-speed chase. Guess who responded on the ambulance? The paramedic. They remembered each other. The paramedic took the high road and gave the trooper the best of care.

Seek first to understand.

We all want others to listen and understand us. If something must change in your organization, seek to understand what effect it will have on others. If you must “take down a fence (especially a sacred fence) seek to find out why the fence was placed there to begin with.” If you start a stampede you might wish the fence was still there.

We need each other.

“The turtle on the fencepost didn’t get there by himself.” For fun, people will put turtles on a fencepost (yes I know it can be deemed animal cruelty, but bear with me). The point is that turtle got there with some help. So it is in the success journey we are all on. We need others to help us. If we are too stubborn or prideful to seek or accept help, if we get to the top it will be lonely. If we do accept help, we should be quick to give credit where credit is due. I am not talking about handouts here, but hand ups. Help others and it will come back to you visibly in ways you would have not expected and invisibly in ways, you may never know.

There are many more ways you can improve the relationships you have worked so hard to develop. I have given you five here as a foundation treating others how you want to be treated. Employ these and see how the environment changes. The good thing – these can be used in any relationships to strengthen them.

What Happened to the Blog?

Question MarkRecently, several people have asked me this question. For the first time since September I don’t have a looming deadline for an audio book. It was in August of last year that I started my audio book narration career, stint, what ever you care to call it and through it all I did not have time to write anything. The answer to the title question: It didn’t go at all.

The problem is that I over estimated what it would take to do audio books. I thought it would be a simple process. I mean,  how hard can it be? It’s just reading a book into a mic, right? Wrong. What I found out is for every hour of audio someone records, there is about four hours of editing, producing, formatting, and performing a quality control check. Honestly, I got in over my head.

I over booked my self and then I joined with a great lady who has learned so much in the way of narration and is great at accepting coaching and critique. We formed a team for audio books that seemed to be missing in the medium we chose to use.

So far, I have  completed four books personally and Becci and I have completed four. We are currently waiting on the approval of our fifth and are set to start our sixth book together. Through these books we have learned to back off and have fun doing the books and to leave time and room for the unexpected and the priorities in life.

The unexpected for us included: increased travel for my day job, increased hours and responsibilities for her at her job, sickness, and learning the ropes for both of us. Learning the ropes was probably the hardest part. I have went back and listened to some of our first books. Boy, how I wish we could do those over again.

For those of you have inquired about my writing, thank you. For those who have inquired about the audio books, thank you. I plan to take the time to start blogging again, this being the first for 2017. The next will be concerning a new direction containing reviews in a format I call “The 360 Second Review with the Salty Eclectic.” I also hope to get back to doing the interview type blogs that I had started in 2016. I also plan to get back to the blogcasts. I believe you find they will be of better quality. Thanks again.